Schlagwort-Archive: Flying

Final Surf of the Rolling Clouds

James Cooper will never forget the day he flew his first Morning Glory. „There’s a photo my wife took, and I’m riding toward her on a bike with a huge smile stretching across my entire face.“ The Perth resident has been gliding since 1980 and says his biggest highlights have been surfing the Gulf of Carpentaria’s world-renowned Morning Glory clouds.

The annual cloud spectacular is the only regular occurrence of its kind in the world. Each year, epic barrels of cloud, some stretching thousands of kilometres, roll across the Gulf of Carpentaria from September to November. The clouds are formed through the interaction of sea breezes on both sides of the Cape York Peninsula.

The Morning Glory clouds also hold cultural significance for the region’s First Nations groups. The Gangalidda Garawa traditional owners believe the spirits of their ancestors travel on the clouds to watch over their people. For decades, travellers from across the country have made the pilgrimage to the Gulf community of Burketown, known as the mecca of the Morning Glory. „It forms much like a wave in the sea,“ Mr Cooper said. „And like a surfer rides a wave coming into the shore, glider pilots can launch into this wave of cloud and fly up and down to take in the view.“

After 40 years of flying, a retiring Mr Cooper couldn’t think of a better way to hang up his wings than with one final surf of the epic phenomenon. „I’ve been flying since 1980; I’ve broken records and won competitions and generally enjoyed myself, but I’ve had enough, and it is time to move on,“ he said of his last flight performed this month.

As Mr Cooper looks to a future with his feet firmly on the ground, he said many more gliders would be taking his place among the clouds. „I used to drive the 4,000 kilometres from Perth to Burketown and meet up with other gliders to see it [the Morning Glory]. „I know people who have been travelling to Burketown for 18 years to fly it. „And the amazing thing is that every Morning Glory cloud is different. „It’s a special place if you’re a glider.“ Source: ‚ABC News Australia‚.

When glider flying meets neuroscience

Neuroimaging studies have provided proof that loss of balance evokes specific neural transient wave complexes in electroencephalography (EEG), called perturbation evoked potentials (PEPs). Online decoding of balance perturbations from ongoing EEG signals can establish the possibility of implementing passive brain-computer interfaces (pBCIs) as a part of aviation/driving assistant systems. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of identifying the existence and expression of perturbations in four different conditions by using EEG signals. Fifteen healthy participants experienced four various postural changes while they sat in a glider cockpit. Sudden perturbations were exposed by a robot connected to a glider and moved to the right and left directions with tilting angles of 5 and 10 degrees. Perturbations occurred in an oddball paradigm in which participants were not aware of the time and expression of the perturbations. We employed a hierarchical approach to separate the perturbation and rest, and then discriminate the expression of perturbations. The performance of the BCI system was evaluated by using classification accuracy and F1 score. Asynchronously, we achieved average accuracies of 89.83 and 73.64% and average F1 scores of 0.93 and 0.60 for binary and multiclass classification, respectively. These results manifest the practicality of pBCI for the detection of balance disturbances in a realistic situation. Source: ‚Planeur.net / Youtube‚.

Emergency landing on a busy highway

View from the pilot’s go pro camera from the cockpit of the plane on the emergency landing on Hwy. 74 on Sunday, July 3, 2022. What an outstanding job and no injuries. Amazing, if you look closely at 0:20 you will see the power lines the pilot was able to avoid. There were so many things that could have been catastrophic but they didn’t happen. Source: ‚Youtube‚.

Flying The Giant | Gliding | 2020

Discover the big and beautiful summits near Chamonix from a sailplane. No engine, only the sound of wind and the power of nature. The smoothest way to enjoy the beauty of mountain. Magical moment shot in 2020 from the Ventus-2a. Source: ‚Delobel Gliding Channel‘.

Africa – Flight for Every Mother

In early 2013, I heard through the grapevine that a British Obstetric Surgeon was intending to fly through Africa in a light aircraft, and offer medical training and supplies in countries along the route. Having always been fascinated with the idea of a long flight through Africa, I got in touch to find out more, and see if there was any way I could help with my experience of flying in Africa to date. Dr Sophia Webster and I ended up getting on well, and discussing the trip in more and more detail – before long, I was asked if I would come along as a more experienced pilot to deal with the aviation side of things. While Dr Webster held a Private Pilot’s Licence, she had relatively few hours of experience and more importantly would need to be devoting most of her time to the medical mission rather than flight planning. Once I had agreed that yes, I would like to go (which was not a difficult thing to convince me of) things started coming together remarkably quickly. Within the space of a few weeks the aircraft lease was organised, vaccinations acquired, flight to Europe booked, and visa and flight clearance process well under way. Find out more about this incredible trip int the Blog ‚Katamarino.co.uk‘.